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©2012 The Chase Group, LLC. All rights reserved. Dr. Seuss Properties ™ & © Dr. Seuss Enterprises, L.P. 2012. All rights reserved. Photographs by Phillip Ritterman.
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Dr. Seuss Sculpture Garden
We are privileged to present, and delighted for you to experience, the Dr. Seuss Touring Sculpture Garden. This exhibition launched on Earth Day, April 22, 2009 at the National Historic Landmark Hotel del Coronado and continues at the world famous San Diego Zoo and the Fresno Metropolitan Museum before traveling to select museums, galleries and prominent locations around the world.

This sculpture collection pays tribute to Theodor Seuss Geisel and the dynamic collection of books and characters created during his career.  Over the course of 54 years, Dr. Seuss produced some of the most recognized and beloved characters of the 20th Century including The Cat in the Hat, Horton the Elephant, The Grinch, The Lorax, Yertle the Turtle, and Green Eggs and Ham’s Sam-I-Am, to name a few.

For the first time in history, bronze sculptures from the Art of Dr. Seuss Collection are being placed in both public and private collections as enduring tributes to Seuss’s prominent messages and ingeniously inspired nonsense.

Theodor Seuss Geisel single-handedly changed the way generations of children learned to read with his 44 books written between 1937 and 1990.  While his most prominent legacy is in children’s literacy, his artistic legacy continues to cross over generations and genres, while singularly impacting the worlds of art, literature, pop and high culture.  Many of today’s top talents pay tribute to Dr. Seuss as a key influence in their own artistic development.

Ted Geisel often said, “I don’t write for children, I write for people.”  Respect for his audience prevailed throughout his career and was instrumental in inspiring us to think imaginatively, to see the world differently, and discover our own ingenious answers to life’s thorny questions.  Seuss often ended his books by posing a question rather than a moral, as he did in The Cat in the Hat and The Lorax, as well as The Butter Battle Book – where it is inventively up to us to decide how the story concludes.  These endings often become beginnings for new intellectual adventures.

“I like nonsense, it wakes up the brain cells.  Fantasy is a necessary ingredient in living; it’s a way of looking at life through the wrong end of a telescope.  Which is what I do, and that enables you to laugh at life's realities.”  Dr. Seuss

With this in mind, savor your time with these wonderfully Seussian characters, lingering by each, recalling your own connection to the lasting messages, enjoyable memories and life principles passed along through them.